Books

Malala’s books | Daily Prompt: BYOB(ookworm)

Daily Prompt: BYOB(ookworm)
Write the blurb for the book jacket of the book you’d write, if only you had the time and inclination. Photographers, artists, poets: show us BOOKS.

Malala Yousafzai:

“Let us pick up our books and our pens, they are the most powerful weapons.” Malala Yousafzai, the schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the Taliban for wanting an education and survived, in her keynote speech to the United Nations, 12th July 2013.” I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban Continue reading

A book, a book, my kingdom for a book!

Yesterday morning – rain, wind, slight chill in the air – I walked totally wrecked and at snail pace towards the bookshop. Voucher in hand, lots of titles written down on paper, just in case my memory checks out on me again.

For a while now I had been looking at certain books, longing to buy them someday. That day came yesterday. Proud as a turkey all dolled up, I went upstairs to the second-hand part of the shop. As I left the elevator, right in front of my eyes stood Friedrich Nietzsche. Just as proud he looked, and slightly cheaper than me, I ran towards him and took him with me. Although thrice known for having chosen the wrong man, I decided to take a chance on dear Friedrich… you know all that jazz about living a wild life? That time had now arrived. Continue reading

Orderly William Butler Yeats

WordPress Daily Prompt: A to Z
Create a short story, piece of memoir, or epic poem that is 26 sentences long, in which the first sentence begins with “A” and each sentence thereafter begins with the next letter of the alphabet. Photographers, artists, poets: show us ORDERLY.

The Collected Works in Verse and Prose of William Butler Yeats, first collected edition of Yeats’s works 1908. Volume I to VIII (Price: €3500) — at Ulysses Rare Books.

The Collected Works in Verse and Prose of William Butler Yeats, first collected edition of Yeats’s works 1908. Volume I to VIII (Price: €3500) — at Ulysses Rare Books.

Continue reading

Erin, by Thomas Moore

Erin! the tear and the smile in thine eyes
Blend like the rainbow that hangs in thy skies,
Shining through sorrow’s stream,
Saddening through pleasure’s beam,
Thy suns with doubtful gleam,
Weep while they rise.

Erin, thy silent tear never shall cease,
Erin, thy languid smile ne’er shall increase,
Till, like the rainbow’s light,
Thy various tints unite,
And form in heaven’s sight
One arch of peace!

Thomas Moore (28 May 1779 – 25 February 1852)

392824_646923801989556_1557352010_n
© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The imperfection of books

WordPress Daily Prompt: Imperfection
Imperfections — in things, in people, in places — add character to life. Tell us about an imperfection that you cherish.

An old book is lying next to me, and it calls me to pick it up and read it. The imperfections of it make me feel as if this book has lived, and that it wants to be cherished for a long time to come. The cover is wrinkled, the pages discoloured and I sense that a lot of time thinking about the content has happened. It is beginning to have that old book scent, the scent only loved by true bibliophiles.

It makes me want to visit my old library again, imperfect because all available space has been filled by other books, yet cherished because I know every corner of the library and what hides in them. The old, creaking seats I used to sit in, to fall under another book’s spell. Imperfect yet loved because the books are not completely sorted by the usual Dewey library classification system and I want to start putting them the right way… happy memories of classifying hundreds and hundreds of books, cherishing the fact that each one had a story behind the story. Imperfect yet liked because it was often a lonely place, leaving me time and space to drift away between rows and rows of knowledge. People stay away from libraries these days and choose digital formats instead of the books of old. Imperfection to me will always be the introduction of digital book readers because books still deserve to be cherished, softly handled and looked at with surprise and admiration. Each one of them has been a work of art, hard labour and soft musings of hopes and dreams. Continue reading

Haunting Joyce

JamesJoyce-copyWords. Letters strung together to form sentences filled with thoughts, ideas and emotions. I thrive on them, books and communication in general included.

I am a true bibliophile. Did library studies and ended up working in one for about 7 years before moving to Ireland. Books were my life as a kid, a teen, a young adult and they are still my life right now. I cannot begin to guess how many books I have read or how many I handled while working in a library and each one was special.

According to Wikipedia, a bibliophile is someone who “loves to read, admire and collect books, often amassing a large and specialized collection. Bibliophiles do not necessarily want to possess the books they love; an alternative would be to admire them in old libraries.” Admire: . Collect: . Libraries: . Now that suits me to a tee! Continue reading

When You Are Old, by William Butler Yeats

When you are old and gray and full of sleep,
and nodding by the fire, take down this
book and slowly read,

and dream of the soft look your eyes
had once,
and of their shadows deep.

How many loved your moments of glad grace,
And loved your beauty with love false or true;
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
And loved the sorrows of your changing face.

And bending down beside the glowing bars,
Murmur, a little sadly, how love fled
And paced upon the mountains overhead,
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.
(William Butler Yeats)

© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Stunning bookstore in Dublin!

Ulysses First English Edition 1922 Limited Edition of 2000 Numbered Copies

Yesterday, after tons of times walking past it to go to my favourite bookstore in Dublin (Hodges Figgis) in Duke Street, my eyes caught a gem of another bookstore. Cathach Books sells first editions of James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett and so many more fantastic Irish authors.

In the window display, a first edition of Ulysses by James Joyce sells at €45000 (approximately $57323,47 or £36099) and if I would ever win the lottery, I would definitely go to the store to buy some of its gems! Now Cathach Books is my favourite bookstore, followed closely of course by Hodges Figgis! Continue reading

“Be awesome! Be a book nut!” (Dr. Seuss)

“In a good bookroom you feel in some mysterious
way that you are absorbing the wisdom contained
in all the books through your skin,
without even opening them.”

(Mark Twain)

“There are worse crimes than burning books.
One of them is not reading them.”
(Joseph Brodsky)

“If you have a garden and a library,
you have everything you need.”

(Marcus Tullius Cicero)

Continue reading

Education

Education is not filling a bucket,
but lighting a fire.
(William Butler Yeats)

© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

W.B. Yeats, the collected poems

“You that would judge me, do not judge
alone this book or that,
come to this hallowed place where my friends’
portraits hang and look thereon;
Ireland’s history in their lineaments trace;
think where man’s glory most begins and
ends and say my glory was I had such friends.”
(William Butler Yeats)

© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Old Library

The Long Room, in Trinity College, Dublin is at nearly 65 metres in length, filled with 200,000 of the Library’s oldest books (built between 1712 and 1732)

“So many books, so little time…”

© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Welcome to the book fetish club!

There’s no certainty in life anymore. You can lose your job… just like that; you can be so stressed your heart starts beating much too fast or you can end up in fights even when you tried so hard to avoid having words.

But then… there’s your bookcase. That tall, sturdy oak piece of furniture that holds secrets, explains wars, teaches you a foreign language, helps you relax or take you to some imaginary world you wished you could live in. I can sit in my living room, bedroom or any other place where I have books lying around and just look at those books. Enjoy their silence even when their characters scream for help. Just sit there and look forward to turning page by page by page, enjoy their scent of all things old or enjoy their fresh new pictures that smell of bookbinding materials.

You cannot open a book without learning something
Confucius
Continue reading

James Joyce, Bloomsday and onions…

James Joyce, one of the controversial omission...

James Joyce, one of the controversial omissions of the Literature Prize (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Last Saturday Ireland celebrated Bloomsday, a day that stands out each year because of the many faces Irish people, foreign residents and visitors alike give it.

For those unknown to what Bloomsday is, Leopold Bloom is the main character in James Joyce’s Ulysses. The story is set in and around Dublin on June 16th, 1904. In 1954 Bloomsday became what it is today and Leopold Bloom and Joyce got their just rewards: a day named after them and a day to showcase the wonderful artistry of Joyce.

I’ve always admired Irish authors; they seem to have a fantastic sense of imagination and they have the gift of putting this into words, much like the Greeks did with their myths. My love for them is old, very old and combined with my love for literature and books; Bloomsday 2012 in the National Library of Ireland was going to be big.

And it truly was as I was reminded of why I love Ireland so much (after all, one of the reasons I wanted to live in Ireland was because of my love for its literature). Senator David Norris, once a Trinity College lecturer and a member of Seanad Éireann, has been credited with being “almost single-handedly responsible for rehabilitating James Joyce in once disapproving Irish eyes”. David Norris holds a degree of M.A. in English Literature and Language in Trinity College and was elected a Foundation Scholar in that subject before achieving a 1st Class Moderatorship. On Bloomsday 2012 he gave an amazing talk on James Joyce in the National Library of Ireland, something I will remember for many years to come. Continue reading

Irish Gaelic you say? Sure! Why not!

As I sit here watching the Tour de France on TG4, the Irish-language TV channel beaming its television rays from the west of Ireland, I have no idea in the world what they’re talking about. Obviously it has to do with the Tour de France it, but other than that they could just as well be selling Lycra on TV instead of trying to cover as much French ground as possible.

Now, I don’t mind my non-existing knowledge anymore of the Irish language. When I just moved to Ireland in 2002 though, I signed up for Irish language classes in the local library, hoping to do something about that non-existence of what is in my belief, a very beautiful language. Suffice it to say that I was one of the very few non-nationals taking the classes and that the other 30 or so people present were all of Irish decent and were already and quite capable of speaking a few words of Irish Gaelic. “So much for Irish for beginners” I thought. A lot of Irish but very little for beginners… Not one for giving up, I thought I’d be able to stick with it and finish the 10-week course but no such luck. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,047 other followers

%d bloggers like this: