MS

Hope cures old wounds

10505565_271992656337777_3335423019850516985_n‘Hypochondria? It’s the only disease I haven’t met yet.’ One of the better jokes I can actually remember, as I simply don’t do long ones.

MS? Awkward, puzzling, easier said than done, and the type of illness that carries this tagline: “the illness is mine, but the tragedy theirs” when asked how the family feels about your condition. Buzzwords that don’t exactly calm down an overactive mind.

Any illness is unwelcome, that much we can agree on. MS can strike in so many different ways that your life at times resembles a war zone. When I entered the MS academy, I read the small print and knew it wouldn’t be a 365-day holiday. But, if one good thing has come from being diagnosed ten years ago, it’s the perception that no matter what happens, life goes on.

And boy, does it go on. Continue reading

MRI scans, hope or defeat

MS images

A war zone. It sounded like a war zone. Sound effects of an AK47 gun amid MRI vibrations and banging noises usually taking place on construction sites. Tinnitus adding an overlay I can miss like never before.

Magnetic resonance imaging is a godsend to ill people. In regards to MS, it gives a clear view on what is physically going wrong inside the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. Add some contrast fluid, and yours can lit up like a Christmas tree, just like mine did this morning. Or so I was told.

Sudden, loud sounds twitches my head involuntarily. The upstairs part of my body locked in a mask, I now realise how Leo felt when he played The Man in the Iron Mask. Continue reading

World MS Day 2015

WMSD2015

For more on World MS Day 2015, check these links:

Twitter – Tweet @WorldMSDay and/or use #strongerthanMS

Facebook – World Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Day

Instagram – worldmsday

YouTube – World MS Day

Pinterest – World MS Day

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

About Willeke

Neurologically challenged by MS and personally by her will to succeed, Willeke is a disability awareness advocate seeking to improve neurological/MS services in Ireland. By highlighting difficult issues that come with such a diagnosis, she hopes her tenacity can bring some dignity to people most in need of a modern, inclusive healthcare system that looks after every aspect of life.

©WVE and Ireland, Multiple Sclerosis & Me, 2011-2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Willeke Van Eeckhoutte and Ireland, Multiple Sclerosis & Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The difference between ALS and MS

 ALS

AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)

ALS is a form of motor neuron disease. It involves the loss of the actual motor nerve cells. The nerves affected are in the spinal cord and those that travel to the voluntary muscles, so there are symptoms of both central and peripheral involvement, with weakness and wasting in arms, legs, and mouth/throat (bulbar). ALS is a rapidly progressive and fatal neuromuscular disease.

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (MS)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable – at times disabling – disease of the central nervous system: which consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The disease attacks the protective myelin covering of the central nervous system, causing inflammation and often destroying the myelin in patches. The severity of MS, rate of progression, and specific symptoms cannot be predicted at the time of diagnosis. Continue reading

10 years: a lot to be thankful for

Inspirational Quotes 4

Ten years ago today, and 2.5 years after moving to Ireland, I was diagnosed with MS, an incurable, neurodegenerative illness that would change my life in ways I never imagined. Needless to say, it was an unwelcome event. Little did I know, however, that it would eventually lead to a life well lived.

There was no manual that showed me how to adapt, accept and live with a chronic illness. MS, associated with 50+ different symptoms, impacts each patient differently. There are numerous symptoms I might never have at all, and that in itself gives hope. Continue reading

I’m only human

images6“I’m only human.”

It’s a phrase we all use sometimes to explain unwanted behaviours and/or consequences. Friedrich Nietzsche would say, ‘Human, all too human’, while I wonder why we simply do the things we do without some foresight, afterthought, or a memory spark that could have shown us how to avoid running into trouble.

My failures or dodgy flaws?

I can be as silly as a young pup, crashing into you or the furniture as I go, have a memory the size of an ant, or simply be as tired as old, worn wallpaper. More than once I ran into myself at lightning speed like atom particles do in the Large Hadron Collider in CERN, and as a result, ended up in hospital in need of IV steroid treatment to get me up and running again. Because of this, my body itself reached the expiry date on steroid use, and it refuses to let it benefit me. In other words, steroids are now a waste of time.

I’m only human. Continue reading

Eyes: pure vision

imagesEyes.

We use them to learn, navigate, assess and appreciate. They help our brain understand our environment and sometimes, as peculiar as it sounds, we use them to listen.

Louis Braille, Stevie Wonder, John Milton, Jorge Louis Borges, Galileo Galilei, Eamon de Valera, Johann Sebastian Bach and many others had eyesight issues. Some managed to produce works of pure genius like John Milton did when he wrote his epic Paradise Lost after he became blind at the age of 43 in 1651. He bent a negative event into a positive one, something that many since Milton have done, and done well.

When one or both start being a nuisance, you certainly feel apprehensive. I’ve been wearing glasses since age 6, and contact lenses since age 20. I should be well-used to handling them so, but I am acutely aware of the tricks eyes can, and in fact, do play.

Continue reading

Medical Apps for Clinicians

285x285_Best_MS_Apps_2014_12MS @Point of Care
MS @Point of Care presents valuable information in an easy-to-digest format. MS @Point of Care is a series of chapters and other tools that aid in making informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management.
Available on iPhone

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

MS Diagnosis and Management
The Multiple Sclerosis – Clinical Care app is designed to be a handy tool for neurologists, resident physicians, and other healthcare providers to aid in the diagnosis and management of MS. Continue reading

1 2 17
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,470 other followers